Posted on by Anabelle Savion

 


Diabetes is a disease characterized by high blood sugar level in blood, but cholesterol level is also commonly elevated, along with disturbances in protein metabolism. The reason for high blood sugar level is due to a deficit of insulin. Therefore the sugars fail to enter the cells and storage depots (like liver and fat cells). 

Many individuals who have diabetes are overweight, but not all. Thus one single diet would not work for everyone.

 

Count your carbs

Dietary planning has never been an easy task in diabetes and is best done with the help of a qualified dietitian, as every person has different needs. In Caucasians, the majority of those who have diabetes are either overweight or obese, but for other ethnic groups, things are entirely different.

There are certain principles in diet planning that work for most people. Two relevant terms that have to be understood are glycemic index and glycemic load. Everyone knows that in diabetes simple sugars must be avoided and one should consume complex carbohydrates. Reason for it being that simple sugars get absorbed very quickly resulting in sugar spikes, meaning they have high glycemic index. Complex carbs are foods with low glycemic index; these are food products in which sugars are digested and broken at a slow pace. Consequently, the body has time to absorb and utilize them, an example of a fruit with low glycemic index is apple. You can find more about foods that are low in the glycemic index here.

Knowing the glycemic index would not help unless a person understands another concept called glycemic load. It indicates the amount of sugar in a product. Some products may have fast absorbing sugars in low quantity thus being safe (low glycemic load). Just think about a small piece of watermelon which is high in water content with a small amount of fast absorbing sugars (thus it has a high glycemic index but very low glycemic load and is safe to consume in diabetes in right quantity).

Therefore, when taking any food, you have to multiply glycemic index with the glycemic load. Simply stated, limit the carbs and calories, do not eat fast absorbing carbs too much, take the carbs wisely (distributed in smaller sizes during the day).

The good food

Diabetes is about being careful about carbs and calories, but a proper diet is much more than carbs. A balanced diet must be rich in good fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats). Some of the excellent sources of such good fats are almonds, avocados, walnuts, canola, olives and olive oil, and fatty fish.

Omega-3 fatty acids (walnuts and fatty fish being the rich source) are worth mentioning, as they are good for blood vessels, brain, heart, and skin.

A fiber-rich diet is another way to improve your skin, heart and general health. Include lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, and whole grains in food.

Finally, limit the trans fats, saturated fats, and sodium intake in the diet, and keep hydrated by increasing fluid intake.

10 tips for eating well with diabetes

  1. Always eat at a fixed time: this is especially true if you are on insulin, this helps to titrate the dose of insulin better, and avoid too much variance in sugar levels.
  2. Eat slow absorbing carbs: like oatmeal or muesli.
  3. Cut on fats: use virgin olive oil, drink low-fat milk, bake the food rather than frying.
  4. Eat five times a day: instead of eating heavy food twice or thrice daily, better divide it into five portions.
  5. Eat beans: lentils, baked beans, chickpeas, are rich in fiber and do not raise blood glucose much.
  6. Eat fish regularly.
  7. Avoid sugar: avoid any sugary drinks, use sweetener in tea or coffee.
  8. Cut down on salt: it raises blood pressure and increases the risk of heart disease, high salt intake is also harmful to your kidneys.
  9. Drink sensibly: drink alcohol in limits, and avoid having alcohol more often than once a week.
  10. Finally, remember that most diabetes foods don’t help. They are expensive and yet with unproven benefit. Thus learn more about the foods that are safe with diabetes and plan.

     

     


    Diabetes is a disease characterized by high blood sugar level in blood, but cholesterol level is also commonly elevated, along with disturbances in protein metabolism. The reason for high blood sugar level is due to a deficit of insulin. Therefore the sugars fail to enter the cells and storage depots (like liver and fat cells). 

    Many individuals who have diabetes are overweight, but not all. Thus one single diet would not work for everyone.

     

    Count your carbs

    Dietary planning has never been an easy task in diabetes and is best done with the help of a qualified dietitian, as every person has different needs. In Caucasians, the majority of those who have diabetes are either overweight or obese, but for other ethnic groups, things are entirely different.

    There are certain principles in diet planning that work for most people. Two relevant terms that have to be understood are glycemic index and glycemic load. Everyone knows that in diabetes simple sugars must be avoided and one should consume complex carbohydrates. Reason for it being that simple sugars get absorbed very quickly resulting in sugar spikes, meaning they have high glycemic index. Complex carbs are foods with low glycemic index; these are food products in which sugars are digested and broken at a slow pace. Consequently, the body has time to absorb and utilize them, an example of a fruit with low glycemic index is apple. You can find more about foods that are low in the glycemic index here.

    Knowing the glycemic index would not help unless a person understands another concept called glycemic load. It indicates the amount of sugar in a product. Some products may have fast absorbing sugars in low quantity thus being safe (low glycemic load). Just think about a small piece of watermelon which is high in water content with a small amount of fast absorbing sugars (thus it has a high glycemic index but very low glycemic load and is safe to consume in diabetes in right quantity).

    Therefore, when taking any food, you have to multiply glycemic index with the glycemic load. Simply stated, limit the carbs and calories, do not eat fast absorbing carbs too much, take the carbs wisely (distributed in smaller sizes during the day).

    The good food

    Diabetes is about being careful about carbs and calories, but a proper diet is much more than carbs. A balanced diet must be rich in good fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats). Some of the excellent sources of such good fats are almonds, avocados, walnuts, canola, olives and olive oil, and fatty fish.

    Omega-3 fatty acids (walnuts and fatty fish being the rich source) are worth mentioning, as they are good for blood vessels, brain, heart, and skin.

    A fiber-rich diet is another way to improve your skin, heart and general health. Include lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, and whole grains in food.

    Finally, limit the trans fats, saturated fats, and sodium intake in the diet, and keep hydrated by increasing fluid intake.

    10 tips for eating well with diabetes

    1. Always eat at a fixed time: this is especially true if you are on insulin, this helps to titrate the dose of insulin better, and avoid too much variance in sugar levels.
    2. Eat slow absorbing carbs: like oatmeal or muesli.
    3. Cut on fats: use virgin olive oil, drink low-fat milk, bake the food rather than frying.
    4. Eat five times a day: instead of eating heavy food twice or thrice daily, better divide it into five portions.
    5. Eat beans: lentils, baked beans, chickpeas, are rich in fiber and do not raise blood glucose much.
    6. Eat fish regularly.
    7. Avoid sugar: avoid any sugary drinks, use sweetener in tea or coffee.
    8. Cut down on salt: it raises blood pressure and increases the risk of heart disease, high salt intake is also harmful to your kidneys.
    9. Drink sensibly: drink alcohol in limits, and avoid having alcohol more often than once a week.
    10. Finally, remember that most diabetes foods don’t help. They are expensive and yet with unproven benefit. Thus learn more about the foods that are safe with diabetes and plan.

       

      Liquid error: Could not find asset snippets/zopim.liquid